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I distrust someone who admits to not enjoying sex or fart jokes.  Part of this is because the individuals who profess such opinions typically reveal themselves as elitists.  There’s an attitude that only uneducated people enjoy hearing stories about people fucking or farting or farting while fucking, and of course nothing like that would ever happen in real life.  Anyone who has actually had sex before however knows that that’s simply not the case.  Beer exists and seeks to make fools of us all.

Speaking of beer, it’s partly because of that that I stumbled across the book Pissing in the Snow & Other Ozark Folktales.  Two years ago I attended an academic conference for 41An3TTd-iL._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_members of Alpha Chi, an academic fraternity that spans the entire United States.  Students from chapters all across the country came to give lectures and presentations from virtually every field.  Lecture topics could range from Pre-Med students discussing the nature of telomeres in DNA to discussing the Indian Boy in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  For my own special I brought in a lecture about Mark Twain’s No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger which was rather eventful given the fact that one of my slides dealt with blackface and one of the moderators in the room was black.  It was a fun couple of days when I wandered through the streets of Chicago (feeling the mean bite of “The Hawk”) with a few friends and a man name Jim Koukl.

Somewhere between the Jazz Bar (where I wrote the start of poem that would eventually get published) and on the ride home, Dr. Koukl mentioned a book.  I admit freely that part of the impulse to look the book up was some kind of fan-boy on my end.  Most of my friends new Koukl and had dozens of fun stories about him and so I think I just wanted him to like me.  In the car, tucked between the driver and a fellow SI leader I pulled up a story called “He did it with a Bucket.”  Describing the story wouldn’t do it justice, so instead here’s the whole story:

One time there was a boy got arrested for screwing a girl, and they claimed he done it standing up, behind the door at the schoolhouse.  But the girl stood pretty neat six-foot-tall, and the boy was a little bit of runt.  The Justice of the Peace says he steel-bucket-590x590don’t see how the boy could reach high enough.  The people said he done it with a milk bucket.  The constable fetched the biggest bucket in the town and made the boy stand on it, but he still lacked a foot.  So the Justice of the Peace says the whole case looks fishy to him, and they turned the boy loose for lack of evidence

After the whole thing blowed over, the girl told some of her friends what really happened.  “We was both standing up,” she says, “and it was the damndest fucking I ever had in my life!”  The ladies all wanted to know how little Johnney could reach that high.  The girl just laughed.  “The little booger put the bucket on my head,” she says, “and then he hung onto the handle like a woodpecker!”  (14)

There wasn’t anyone in the car who wasn’t laughing and I scrambled to Amazon to immediately buy a copy.

Pissing in the Snow is the work of Vance Randolph, an American folklorist who published around five books over the course of his life.  All of his books dealt with the Ozark region, an area of hilly forest region found in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri deliverance-620x412(pronounced Mizz-ur-ee or Mizz-ur-uh depending on what part of the state you’re from).  This region is probably familiar to the reader who has ever watched the film Deliverance and believed that that is a good representation of entire South of the United States.  For the record Deliverance took place in Georgia, however it has unfortunately come to embody the imagery of the “hillbilly” who is in fact not a gap-toothed lunatic who enjoys raping people in the woods.  Well, okay, there’s probably one of those out there, but I promise you that ass-clown is in the minority.  Also ass-clown was probably the wrong word to use there and now I’m going to have nightmares.

Randolph’s work is important because it collects the sentiments, moods, feelings, and d67ef6ac88760e78fb4680116e20e5b9general humor of a people who lived and made a life in the woods of Ozarks.  The reader may wonder what value such stories have to the general culture given the fact that most of them are nothing but stories about people fucking, talking about fucking, or horny priests, prostitutes, or men measuring their dicks.  I suppose this concern is a fair criticism and the first story from the collection doesn’t necessarily help that much:

One time there was two farmers that lived out on the road to Carrico.  They was always good friends, and Bill’s oldest boy had been a-sparking one of Sam’s daughters.  Everything was going fine till the morning they met down by the creek, and was pretty goddam mad.  “Bill,” says he, “from now on I don’t want that boy of yours to set foot on my place.”

“Why what’s he done?”

“He pissed in the snow, that’s what he done, right in front of my house!”

“But surely, there ain’t great harm in that,” Bill says.Stella

“No Harm!” hollered Sam.  “Hell’s fire, he pissed so it spelled Lucy’s name, right there in the snow!”

“The boy shouldn’t have done that,” says Bill.  “But I don’t see nothing so terrible bad about it.”

“Well, by God, I do!” yelled Sam.  “There was two sets of tracks.  And besides, don’t you think I know my own daughter’s handwriting!”  (5).

It took me three readings of this one before I realized Lucy used Bill’s son’s penis to spell her own name.  This story at first appears to be a simple joke, just a random story about two teenagers engaging in a little debauchery for the sake of it, but upon reflection I’m struck by the fact that my first thought is the myth of Piramus and Thisbe.  Growing up in a private school I was exposed to mythology early.  Despite the fact it was a Christian school it was also a college prep institution and so they wanted you to excel.  Once we hit eighth grade we were assigned Edith Hamilton’s Mythology.  That dense tome that can always be found in your local college book-store or else the book section of Goodwill, and of course always bent back with a broken spine and riddled with doodles or 6e958785e31483a2a197621eabb33004highlighting.  Before my teacher assigned us A Midsummer Night’s Dream to read in class she covered the myth of Piramus and Thisbe, and I was already familiar with the book because I had read Romeo & Juliet the year before and we had gone over the myth.  To those who don’t know there are two warring families with a son and a daughter named Pyramus and Thisbe respectively.  The pair fall in love but can only communicate by sending messages through a crack in the wall that separates both families.  Eventually overcome with lust Piramus arranges to meet Thisbe and tun away with her.  She says yes, but of course because this is myth everything goes wrong.  Thisbe spots a lion and runs away dropping her sash, Pyramus comes upon it later and spots lion tracks.  Believing his lover is dead he drives his sword into his side, and when Thisbe discovers him slain by his own hand she removes the sword and kills herself with it.

My reader may read this and wonder immediately: how the fuck do you get Piramus and Thisbe from a story about Pissing in the Snow?  That’s absurd.appalachia-1280x1021

My response: Is it though.  Folk-lore and myth and divided by time and repetitive story-telling.  Looking at Hamilton’s Mythology in hindsight I was also taught at the time the legends or folk-lore of Pecos Bill, Paul Bunyan, John Henry, and Johnny Appleseed.  Unfortunately, these heroes have not lasted the way Zeus, Aphrodite, and Hera have, nevertheless both pantheons linger on in their own way.  The stories of Pecos Bill, like the stories of Zeus, and also the stories contained in Pissing in the Snow are perpetuated by story-tellers who were inspired by some original action.  Was there ever a god named Zeus?  Of course not, but there was a storm where a man was struck by lightning.  Was there ever a Pecos Bill, of course not, but there was most likely a man who was a sure-fire shot and who was great at breaking horses.  Were there ever two kids who spelled their names in the snow using piss?

Yes there was, that one probably happened, but over time the names and situation changed.cb07d-oldmanhenryandwife

Stories develop over time to fit the world views of the audience that preserves them and enjoys hearing them.  Jokes then follow myth, however the fundamental difference being they are often designed to reaffirm or subvert reality.  Pissing in the Snow isn’t interested in that however, for even if the stories are imbued with humor their aim is to present human beings at their most fallible.

The stories almost all center around sex in some form or fashion, and while some border on the crude there are others which are fascinating from a feminist perspective.  Take for instance the story Have You Ever Been Diddled:tumblr_nqv8h3QX8m1t1oy52o4_500

One time there was a town girl and a country girl got to talking about the boys they had went with.  The town girl told what kind of car her boyfriends used to drive, and how much money their folks has got.  But the country girl didn’t take no interest in things like that, and she says the fellows are always trying to get into her pants.

So finally the town girls says, “Have you ever been diddled?”  The country girl giggled, and she says yes, a little bit.  “How much says the town girl.”  “Oh, about like that,” says the country girl, and she held up her finger to show an inch, or maybe an inch and a half.

The town girl just laughed, and pretty soon the country girl says, “Have you ever been diddled?”  The town girl says of course she has, lots of times.  “How much?” says the country girl.  “Oh, about like that,” says the town girl, and she marked off about eight inches, or maybe nine.d9a2804a4b1cf448d5a38f594af11416

The country girl just set there goggle-eyed, and she drawed a deep breath.  “My God,” says the country girl, “that ain’t diddling!  Why, you’ve been fucked!”  (110-11)

A story like this is an excellent opportunity for folklorists to dig into the rhetoric of everything.  The use of the words “town-girl” verses “country girl” as a way of expressing familiarity with the world.  Then there’s also the class element as the “town girl” seems to enjoy high priced objects.  And of course there’s the linguistic opportunity to observe how the scene culminates in the “fuck” to deliver the powerful finale to this brief exchange, but that gets into far more academic territory than I’m willing to explore here, and besides why should I put rhetoricians and folklorists out of a job?  They’re good people with great unions but lousy tippers.

This story seems to present the total essence of Pissing in the Snow, partly because it’s the least fantastic.  There are stories ranging from the dick measuring contests of locals, the horny priests being wooed by windows, prostitutes enacting vengeance, and endless 050b68462876b5319a277ebdfeb9db9fstories of young lovers winding up embarrassed or mocked by the community they live in but the final component is everything.  Pissing in the Snow feels communal while the reader actually reads it, and in fact the only real way to read it is out loud.  These are recorded stories by average everyday people who had these stories memorized, who lived with these stories that had most likely been passed down by generations.  Their earthiness and near-constant crudeness reveals a people who lived and interacted with sexuality  without any kind of real shame, and while some would suggest that this is wrong, Pissing in the Snow shows a people who wouldn’t really care about this response.

And to be honest I don’t care much about it either.Screen-shot-2015-04-09-at-13.33.08

These stories show a people who were able to find a beautiful absurdity in the body.  Penises, vaginas, breasts, and butts are what drives these narratives, and while this at first doesn’t seem to reveal much intellectual potential, I would argue otherwise.  Reading Pissing in the Snow is a chance to see how another culture has framed sexuality in its own paradigm.  The people of the Ozarks are not prudes about it, they recognize that people fuck, and, clearly, they enjoy doing it.  While some members of the community sometimes suffer from it, what is constant is that the people of the Ozarks recognize sex as something natural and more important, a source of amusement.

Take for instance the story The Baby Lost Weight:

One time there was a young woman fetched a baby into Doc Henderson’s office, and she says it is losing weight.  Doc examined the baby awhile, and asked the woman about her victuals, but she says, “What I eat ain’t got nothing to do with the baby being skinny.”  Doc figured she must be kind of stupid, so he didn’t ask no more questions.mammary

Doc examined her mighty careful, anyhow.  And he pulled her dress open, to see if something is the matter with her tits, first one and then the other.  There wasn’t no milk at all.  Finally, she says, “That’s my sister’s baby, you know.”

Old Doc Henderson was considerable set back when he heard that, because he never thought but what it was her baby.  “Hell’s fire,” he says, “you shouldn’t have come!”  The young woman just kind of giggled.  “I didn’t,” she says, “till you started a-sucking on the second one.”  (130).

I honestly found myself laughing while I read this book, and too often it becomes undervalued that reaction.  Books are an intellectual exercise, and if I wanted to I could sit down and find real intellectual merit beneath the endless penis and fart jokes in this book, and in fact I already have.  Human beings have progressed in their evolution and that is partly because of the way sex has become something recreational rather than simply procreational.*

That’s a fancy-pants way of saying people enjoy having sex not just because they want to make a baby.

Because our species has developed an imagination, and because that imagination is often employed constructing sexual fantasies, it makes sense that a rural people, people who Appalachian-Mountainslived off the land and would know the proper way of breeding livestock, would eventually come to see sex as something funny and absurd, but ultimately uniting because in the end these stories helped shape a community’s, as well as a region’s, attitudes about sexuality.

Laughing at sex is the sanest way to begin talking about it and teaching it.  And if you can start by telling a story about an old man masturbating while across the way a young man is porking a rabbit, it’s gonna be a whole lot easier telling people about condoms later.

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*Writer’s Note*

For the record “procreational is NOT a word, but I liked the way it sounded.  If you are repulsed by this invention of mine petition Websters and Oxford to add the word to the dictionary so that your disgust is unmerited.  Prude.

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